Association between bone discordance and dietary pattern among Iranian postmenopausal women

  • Leila Khorrami-nezhad Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences International Campus, Tehran, Iran
  • Sajjad Moradi Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences International Campus, Tehran, Iran
  • Azadeh Dehghan Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences International Campus, Tehran, Iran
  • Zahra Veysi Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences International Campus, Tehran, Iran
  • Mir saeed Yekaninejad Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Zhila Maghbooli Mail Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran, University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Khadijeh Mirzaei Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences International Campus, Tehran, Iran
Keywords:
dietary pattern, bone discordance, unhealthy pattern, Mediterranean pattern, postmenopausal women

Abstract

Background: Bone discordance considered a new challenge to a diagnosis of osteoporosis, especially among postmenopausal women, there are many causes have been proposed for the occurrence of this phenomenon. This study was conducted to investigate the relation between major dietary patterns and bone discordance in postmenopausal women.
Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 258 postmenopausal women completed demographic data from June 2015 to February 2016. Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Dietary patterns were created by PCA method from 25 food groups. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed on lumbar (L2-L4) and hip for cases.
Results: Three major dietary patterns were identified by using factor analysis based on baseline intake data: Unhealthy, Mediterranean and Western diet. After analysis, we found 55.41% were concordance and 44.56% (4.26% were in the major discordance group of participants were discordance. We found participants who were in discordance group were younger, and obese participants were more talented to be in the major discordance group. We found an inversely relationship between unhealthy dietary pattern and hip and lumbar Z score, while there was a positive relationship between Mediterranean dietary pattern and hip BMD. No associations were found between dietary pattern and bone discordance.
Conclusion: This study concluded that bone discordance was directly related to obesity. Obese and younger women were at risk of bone discordance. Unhealthy and a Mediterranean dietary pattern were negatively and positively related to bone density among postmenopausal women

 

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Published
2017-08-01
How to Cite
1.
Khorrami-nezhad L, Moradi S, Dehghan A, Veysi Z, Yekaninejad M saeed, Maghbooli Z, Mirzaei K. Association between bone discordance and dietary pattern among Iranian postmenopausal women. J Nutr Sci & Diet. 2(3).
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Original Article(s)